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    This New Anti-NCAA Documentary Could Be College Football’s Blackfish

    The Business of Amateurs Scott Ross played linebacker for the University of Southern California in the late ‘80s, making multiple trips to the Rose Bowl. For most college football players, such achievements are the pinnacle of sport. “It was like walking next to gladiators,” Ross says of his college career in the opening lines of the new documentary, The Business of Amateurs. “It was the coolest thing you could ever feel.” Ross’ perspective changed over the years. In this documentary about the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Ross reflects on his football life and afterlife with grizzled humility, serving as an articulate spokesman for the sport’s damaged discards. Throughout the documentary, the…

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    You Can Soon Wear A Leather Jacket Made From Alexander McQueen’s Skin

    It’s no secret that in the fashion industry, certain looks appear fresh one minute only to seem stale as week-old bread the next. In an attempt to stay abreast of rapidly shifting trends, some designers are going to extreme lengths, and for Tina Gorjanc, that means growing leather from human DNA. Though Gorjanc’s designer jackets won’t be sourced from just any human DNA—they’ll be reproductions of Alexander McQueen’s very essence. Dubbed “Pure Human,” the project will use McQueen’s actual DNA to grow human skin that will then be tanned and conditioned to create clothes and accessories. But unlike your typical batch of animal leather, the human-made variety is susceptible to sunburn,…

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    One Humble Sugar-Free Drink Is Taking On The Soda Industry

    Paddy Spence grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts halfway between mansions on Brattle Street and public housing half a mile in the other direction. “I saw it all and pretty early on realized where I fit in,” says 49-year-old Spence. “My mom was a single mother who cleaned houses and worked office jobs for a living, and while our household was economically challenged, I still was able to attend a local private school on scholarship and saw how my affluent classmates lived, which was very different than my day-to-day existence.” For Spence’s mother, however, eating healthy was always a family priority—a priority that would one day make its way into Spence’s…

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    What You Need To Know About The North Dakota Access Pipeline Dispute 

    Over the summer, a controversy of David and Goliath proportions has been bubbling up in North Dakota. Here’s what you need to know.  What’s happening: A major battle over an oil pipeline  The Dakota Access Pipeline, a 1,172 mile-long oil conduit, is at the epicenter of a battle between Big Oil and small Native American tribes. At a cost of $3.7 billion, the pipeline’s economic impact is estimated to be well into the billions and could create 8,000 to 12,000 construction jobs.  Where: It’s set to intersect sacred land The proposed pipeline would snake through North and South Dakota, Iowa, and end in Illinois with the goal of tapping into the estimated 7.4 billion barrels of newly discovered oil found in…

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    Here’s How Insanely Rich You’d Be If You Bought Apple Stock Instead Of Having Kids 

    If one new calculator is to be taken seriously (which it isn’t), parents might be kicking themselves for having kids instead of investing in Apple in the 1980s and early ‘90s. Released on Monday, the website What If I Bought Apple Instead helps parents and curious individuals calculate how much money they would have made had they invested their kid’s college fund and living expenses in Apple stock instead. The calculator works by estimating how much money upper, middle, and lower income families would have spent on children born between January of 1981 and July of 2016. Apple went public in December of 1980 and had a closing price of…

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    These Quirky Cartoons May Be The Key To Conquering Social Anxiety

    When Mexican cartoonist Ani Castillo first moved to Canada ten years ago, she quickly found herself overwhelmed by her new city. Learning a new language, being isolated from her family, and having to make all new friends compounded the everyday stresses we all face. Following the advice of a renowned psychiatrist, Castillo began channeling her anxieties into cartoons that both helped her cope and resonated with a wide audience. GOOD had the chance to speak with Castillo about her art and how pursuing creative projects can help all of us manage the anxiety of being a human in a rapidly evolving world.  Your Emoticons For Complex Emotions illustration is funny…

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    Science On The Campaign Trail: See Where The Candidates Stand

    In the midst of a heated election cycle, let’s take a break for a guessing game. Which political figure said the following? Ok, I’ll spare you the suspense: It was Richard Nixon, back in 1960 when he was Dwight Eisenhower’s vice president. Since then, we’ve been to the moon and cured major diseases. We’ve invented the internet, wireless communication, and solar power. In countless labs across the nation, both within universities and the private sector, we’ve developed tools that bring us closer to clean air, water, and energy. Science used to be non-partisan, but it’s increasingly become politicized. Democrats these days are generally pro-science, and like it or not, most Republicans on the campaign trail…

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    Watch A Black Female Officer’s Scathing Denouncement Of Alton Sterling’s Killers

    A strong voice of condemnation emerged this week in Nakia Jones, a black female police officer from Ohio. In a scathing Facebook Live video, Jones cast shame on the police officers who shot and killed Alton Sterling in Baton Rouge. “I’m so hurt, it bothers me when people say: ‘police officers this’ or ‘police officers that,’” says Jones . “They put us in this negative category, but I’m saying to myself, ‘I’m not that kind of police officer.’” Jones works in Warrensville Heights, a city of 13,000, but she makes plain in the video that she was born and raised in the rougher side of Cleveland, where she currently resides.…

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    Your Baby, No Sex Required

    Part 3 of 19 See all › Issue 38: 10th Anniversary Issue Next: Dear Obama, Don’t Forget To Write Say a couple wants to have a baby, but they’re infertile. Or they have a weird genetic disease. Or they’re gay. Or they aren’t a couple at all — a single parent just wants to go it alone. Right now, these would-be parents have three options: IVF, adoption, or surrogacy. All three are terrific methods, but they’re also imperfect: inconvenient, expensive, and risky. Soon these practices may become more obsolete. According to Henry Greely, director of Stanford Law School’s Center for Law and the Biosciences, we’re only 20 years away from…

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    Tobacco Farmers Are Joining The Mile High Club

    It should come as no surprise that—like print journalist, video store clerk or disco ball maker—tobacco farmer is an endangered profession in 2016. Anti-smoking campaigns, punishing taxes and an increasingly unfavorable perception of smokers have led to plummeting tobacco sales. So if you’re a farmer who long depended on the crop for your livelihood, what are your options? You could go the small-batch, organic tobacco route. You could grow tobacco for the next generation of flu vaccines. You could completely pivot, transitioning all your land to delicious, healthful veggies (or weed!) Or you could get in on a potentially lucrative side hustle for tobacco—converting it into jet fuel. The Guardian just…